When hot showers go cold.

There’s nothing like starting the day off with an invigorating hot shower. That is, until it gives way to an arctic dousing just a couple minutes into your steaming morning soak. What gives?

Well, getting the cold shoulder from your shower can be attributed to a number of things. The following are a few ways to keep your shower’s hot water from turning cold prematurely.

Your Water Heater
Begin by checking all the fixtures in your house to see if your cold-water issue involves just your shower or the entire house. If none of the plumbing allows hot water to pass through, then your water heater is the problem. Check the unit’s temperature control to see if it’s on the right setting. If it’s an electric model, check for a blown fuse. For gas units, it may require relighting the pilot light. If there’s still no sign of hot water after the pilot light has been relit, the problem could lie in a variety of things: obstructions in the flue, a defective part, a faulty temperature control or a buildup of sediment.

Your Shower
Your hot water problem could lie within the pipes of your bath stall. Unless you live in a home with copper piping systems – which rarely corrode and stay free flowing – you may have to address or even replace your galvanized steel pipes. Or, it could just be that you need to open the hot water valve if it’s partially or fully closed.

Your Valves
If the hot water shortage persists, you might have to replace your bathroom shower valve. When the rubber parts in the valve become worn and distorted from old age, they can swell up and restrict the waterways. As the water temperature traveling through the valve increases, so does the swelling, which usually leads to the parts breaking off and obstructing the hot water valve.

Of course, diagnosing your hot water shower problems is a lot easier than fixing them. Before you attempt to go it alone, give us a call. We’d be happy to come out and help determine the best way to ensure both your money and your hot showers go a long way.